TV

Caillou: A Heartfelt Goodbye

This is, quite frankly, the hardest thing I’ve ever had to write. The thought that I have to say goodbye after nearly 25 years of bliss seems almost too heartbreaking to be true, yet here we stand.

In a tweet by PBS Kids this morning they announced that they would be officially cancelling the beloved show after a 24 year run on the air.

We can only hope that this is in preparation for the long rumored CCU (Caillou Cinematic Universe) but alas, it appears our beautiful bald friend has yee’d his last haw.

First of all, we just want to acknowledge that if this is impacting you nearly as much as it is us, we are here, we’re in your corner, and if you need to talk, our DMs are open, but we need to think of the positives. The cancellation of Caillou is the definition of “Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.” We were blessed for nearly a quarter century with some of the greatest storylines ever conceived of for the animated medium. Nay, in history.

Who can forget such absolute bangers as

“Caillou’s Surprise Breakfast” (Season One, Episode 44) which taught us that though you may think you can enlist the help of your toddler sister to make breakfast without your parents, you probably can’t so don’t even try.

“Caillou’s Quarrel” (Season One, Episode 47) which taught us that if your friend wants to play tea party when you want to play dinosaurs (seriously, what a wuss) the best course of action is to throw an absolute hissy fit, apologize after your mom makes you, then go play catch with your big brother like a real man.

and of course

“Caillou’s New Shoes” (Season One, Episode 26) which taught us that sometimes, you get new shoes? Yeah. That.

Critics of the show have long maintained that Caillou is a veiled criticism of American expansionism and the military industrial complex, and that “Caillou’s New Shoes” was intended to be an indictment on the consumeristic nature of the modern world. Some claim that it’s just a children’s book series adapted to a cartoon, but we’ll leave that up to the historians to sort out.

What we do know is that for years we have been blessed with one of the greatest creations in all of media, and our only regret was that we did not enjoy the ride enough while we were on it.

As Andy Bernard from NBC’s “The Office” so eloquently put “I wish there was a way to know you were in the good old days, before you’ve left them” (Bernard, et al. 2013)

Unfortunately, though, the show ended on a cliffhanger. In the final episode “You’re not Miss Martin” Caillou struggles when Miss Martin, his usual teacher, is away for a couple days.

-(Side bit of trivia, did you know Miss Martin was away because she was an extra in CATS (2019)) *Citation Needed*

He didn’t take too kindly to the new substitute, Mrs. Shelley as she had literally zero concept of how things were supposed to be run around the preschool classroom (seriously, the nerve of this lady) and though we’re eventually shown that Caillou warms up to Mrs. Shelley, we never get a conclusive answer on what happened to Miss Martin. Our only hope is that they’re leaving an opening for her character to be explored in more depth in a future spin-off, perhaps in the launch of phase one of the CCU (Caillou Cinematic Universe), but alas, it appears that we will never know what fate befell our beloved preschool teacher.

At this time I’d like to include a few prepared statements from some team members here at Fanatic Media

“I am so sad for the loss of our bald boy, he will be deeply missed. I will count my breaths until we’re together again, so long Caillou” -Pris @leiarebellion

“I’m sad as f***. RIP Caillou” -Will Custer @GMFWilly

“What the hell is a Caillou?

Oh this little weirdo?!

I’ve seen him around but I don’t know what he gets up to” -Patrick Mulligan @naansecular

Unfortunately Mack Veltman (@mackveltman) was unavailable for comment, but we can only assume he is in mourning like the rest of us.

From all of us here at Fanatic Media:

To our beloved Caillou,

Goodnight sweet prince.

Until we meet again.

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